The Plant-Based Diet: What Is It and How To Start

Whether you’re vegetarian, vegan or a meat eater interested in integrating more plant-based foods into your diet, there’s no question that plant-based has gone mainstream. But it’s more than just fruits and vegetables. A plant-based diet can include nuts, seeds, oils, whole grains, legumes and beans also. And it is not synonymous with being a vegan. Technically, a plant-based diet contains proportionately more foods from plant sources.

In AFN’s podcast about plant-based eating, the stories and health struggles of Fay Knights and Ashley Swanson are revealed. After consulting with healthcare professionals and doing their own research on plant-based eating, they each decided to incorporate more plant-based foods into their diet and achieved positive results.

One criticism of a plant-based diet is that it is too expensive for the average income-earner. However, both Fay and Ashley agree that cooking plant-based at home is not expensive. Ashley can do it for less that $3 per meal!

If you’re thinking of adding more plant-based foods to your diet or are looking for more plant-based recipes, here are some breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes:

BREAKFAST

PEANUT BUTTER BANANA SMOOTHIE (Courtesy of Fay Knights)

Ingredients

  • 1 1/3 cup organic unsweetened coconut milk or preferred milk alternative
  • 1 tbsp coconut milk powder
  • 2 tbsp organic smooth peanut butter
  • 1 small banana
  • 1 tbsp hemp hearts
  • 1 tsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp chia seeds
  • ¼ tsp organic ground cinnamon

Optional

  • 1 tbsp unflavoured collagen powder
  • 1 scoop vanilla vegan protein powder unsweetened

Instructions:

  1. Add all ingredients to blender, blend on high until smooth and enjoy!

Notes:

  • This smoothie also works well with any other type of nut butter, i.e.: almond, cashew, Brazilian nut, and hazelnut.
  • You can also substitute the maple syrup for coconut nectar
  • If you don’t have coconut milk powder, add a spoon of organic coconut oil or coconut cream.

 

BLUEBERRY-GREEN SMOOTHIE (Courtesy of Fay Knights)

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cup organic coconut milk or preferred milk alternative
  • 1 tbsp coconut milk powder
  • ½ teaspoon grated ginger
  • 2 tsp maple syrup
  • 2 handfuls of fresh baby spinach or kale or both
  • ½-¾ cup organic blueberries
  • ½ a banana, frozen or regular

Optional:

  • 1 tsp chia seeds
  • 1 serving unflavoured collagen powder
  • ½ scoop vanilla vegan protein powder (look for no sugar added)

Instructions

  1. Add all ingredients to blender, blend on high until smooth and enjoy!

 

BAKED PUMPKIN STEEL CUT OATS (Courtesy of Ashley Swanson)

Ingredients

  • ½ tsp ground nutmeg
  • ½ tsp ground ginger
  • ½ tsp ground allspice
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • ¼ cup pure maple syrup or coconut sugar or brown sugar
  • 1 (15 oz) can pure pumpkin puree
  • 1 (14 oz) can full fat coconut milk
  • 4 ½ cups water or plant milk
  • 2 cups steel cut oats

Toppings: pecans, pepitas, hemp seeds, sliced apples, maple syrup, plant milk

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients, except steel cut oats, in a large pot on the stove. Over med-high heat, bring to a soft boil.
  2. Stir in steel cut oats. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 20-25 minutes (stirring every 5-10 minutes) or until oats are tender.
  3. Remove from heat and let sit covered for 5-10 minutes.
  4. Serve immediately or portion out into your meal prep containers for the week. Top with your favorite toppings, a drizzle of maple syrup, and a splash of plant milk.

Recipe Notes

You can try making this in the oven for a more hands-free approach. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C). Combine all the ingredients in a large bowl, mix well. Pour mixture into oven safe dish. Bake for 45-55 minutes. Let cool for 5-10 minutes before serving or portioning out into meal prep containers.

LUNCH

CREAMY CARROT-GINGER SOUP (Courtesy of Fay Knights)

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium onion roughly chopped
  • 2 -3 tsp freshly grated ginger
  • 3 cups organic low-sodium chicken broth or veggie broth works well too
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 lb bag of organic baby carrots this is usually the small bag, the big bags are 2lbs
  • 1 cup frozen butternut squash
  • ½ can full fat coconut milk
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • Pinch of fresh or dried thyme
  • Sea salt & ground pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. In a medium-large pot, heat olive oil on medium-high and add in chopped onion. Sautee for 2-3 minutes. Add a sprinkle of salt and pepper and then add in the ginger and sautée for 1 more minute.
  2. Add in carrots then pour in broth and water, ensuring all ingredients are covered with liquid. Bring to a boil and let boil for 10 minutes.
  3. Add in garlic powder, thyme, coconut milk, and squash. Boil for another 10 minutes.
  4. Poke carrots with fork, they should be tender and easy to fork – that’s when you know it’s ready.
  5. Remove from heat and then with a handheld blender, blend until creamy (about 3 minutes).

Optional:

  1. Top with toasted walnuts, sunflower or pumpkin seeds.

Notes

Serve hot or let cool and store in the fridge for up to three days. You can also store in an air-tight container in the freezer and thaw out 8-12 hours prior to using.

 

SAVOURY JACKFRUIT BOWLS (Courtesy of Ashley Swanson)

Serving: 3-4

Creamy Cashew Butter Sauce (Makes enough for one (14.5 oz) can jackfruit)

Ingredients

  • 2 heaping tbsp cashew butter (or any combination of nut/seed butters)
  • 1 tbsp tamari
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • 2-6 tbsp hot water (add 2 tbsp at a time to thin)

Instructions

  1. Add ingredients to a small bowl (except water) and whisk well to combine.
  2. Add water, 2 tbsp at a time, to thin.
  3. Taste test. If too savory, add a little maple syrup (1-3 tsp). If too thin, add more nut/seed butter. Add mixture to jackfruit (see below).

Jackfruit Mixture

Ingredients

  • ½ yellow onion
  • 1 (14.5 oz) can jackfruit
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Sautée ½ diced, yellow onion until translucent, about 5 min.
  2. Add 1 (14.5 oz) canned jackfruit, shredding it with your fingers as you do so, and cook for another 3-5 min.
  3. Pour sauce over jackfruit mixture and stir well to combine, cooking for another 3-5 min.
  4. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve with cooked quinoa, greens or broccolini, cooked butternut squash or sweet potatoes, and a lemon tahini dressing.

 

DINNER

CHICKPEA MASALA (Courtesy of Fay Knights)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup basmati rice
  • 1 can organic cooked chickpeas
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1 cup frozen cubed carrots
  • 1 small diced onion
  • 1 small crushed garlic glove or ½ tsp organic garlic powder
  • 1 ½ cups organic tomato sauce
  • ½-1 cup water
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼ tsp each salt & ground pepper

Optional

  • handful of finely chopped parsley
  • pinch of cumin or coriander

Instructions

  1. Prepare basmati rice as per package instructions.
  2. Wash and strain chickpeas.
  3. While rice is cooking, in a media pot, sauté diced onions and garlic on medium-high until slightly golden (2-3 minutes).
  4. Add in all remaining ingredients to pot, pour water in last.
  5. The amount of water to add can vary slightly.  You want to make sure all ingredients are covered with liquid (not swimming in it but just enough to cover). If the tomato sauce you use is more runny, you will need less water. I typically need around ½-1 cup of water.
  6. Stir all ingredients well then put the lid on.
  7. Once the sauce starts to simmer, turn heat down to medium and let cook for 10 minutes.
  8. If after 10 minutes you find the masala too watery for your liking, remove lid and cook for an additional 5 minutes or add 1 tsp of cornstarch.
  9. Plate desired amount of rice and top with chickpea masala and enjoy!

 

INSTANT POT LASAGNA SOUP (Courtesy of Ashley Swanson)

Servings: 6-8

Ingredients

  • 20 oz frozen veggies (I used 10 oz mirepoix & 10 oz carrots)
  • ½ cup split lentils
  • 5 oz diced tomatoes (I used fire roasted)
  • 1 cup marinara sauce
  • Italian herbs (1 tsp dried basil, 1 tsp dried oregano, 1 tsp dried sage, 1 tsp dried thyme plus 1/2 tsp garlic powder and ½ tsp onion powder)
  • 4 cups veggie broth (add more to thin, mine is more stew-like)
  • 6-10 no boil lasagna noodles
  • 1 cup chopped frozen greens

Instructions

  1. Add all ingredients (except lasagna noodles and greens) to an Instant Pot and stir well to combine. Add lasagna noodles, making sure they’re submerged in liquid.
  2. Place lid on securely with quick release valve closed and manually set Instant Pot to 3 minutes.
  3. Once cooking is complete, use quick release valve to release pressure fully, then carefully remove lid.
  4. Mix in 1 cup chopped frozen greens.
  5. Dish out into meal prep containers and store in fridge for 5-6 days.
  6. Reheat portions daily and top with nutritional yeast and red pepper flakes.

 

All content or opinions expressed in this blog are for informational purposes only and are not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please seek advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare practitioner.

Better For You Desserts

Better For You Desserts

Desserts are ever so tempting, aren’t they? At AFN we believe that desserts shouldn’t be off the table just because you want to eat healthier or because you have food restrictions. There are workarounds. And there’s not one dessert for everyone. From vegan, to lower sugar, to vegetable additions to desserts (yes, it can be tasty), here are some desserts we have compiled with some help from our audience.

VEGAN DOUBLE CHOCOLATE CAKE BALLS

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup almond flour
  • 1/2 cup hemp protein powder
  • 1/4 cup almond milk
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons coconut sugar
  • 1/4 cup dairy free chocolate chips

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
  2. Mix all the ingredients together except for the chocolate chips.
  3. On a pan start forming flat patties with the batter.
  4. Start forming balls with the batter and put the chocolate chips inside
  5. Make sure the balls are completely closed.
  6. Put in the oven for 20 minutes (check on it every once and a while to prevent possible burning).
  7. Take out and let cool.

 


 

CHOCOLATE ZUCCHINI MUFFINS (DAIRY-FREE) 

Ingredients

  • ½ cup unsweetened applesauce
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup oil (we used canola but you can substitute)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup grated zucchini, unpeeled (about 1 zucchini) and patted dry with paper towel
  • 1 ¼ cup flour
  • ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 ½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a 12 cup muffin tin.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together applesauce, sugar, oil, eggs, oil and vanilla. Add grated zucchini and mix.
  3. In another larger bowl, whisk flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda and salt until blended. Add chocolate chips and mix.
  4. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and mix.
  5. Spoon batter (Tip: we like to use an ice cream scooper for this part) into muffin cups. Bake for 20 minutes or until a toothpick comes out fairly clean.

 


 

CARROT CAKE

Preheat oven to 350⁰F.  Grease and flour a cake tin (I use butter and use 2-3 small cake tins)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup flour (can use organic spelt)
  • ¾ cup sugar (can reduce according to your preference)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ¾ tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • 5/8 cup oil (canola or your preference)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup grated carrots
  • ½ of a 14 oz can of crushed pineapple, well drained
  • ¼ cup (or more) of chopped walnuts (optional)

Instructions

  1. Mix all dry ingredients.  Add eggs and oil and mix well.  The mixture should have a thick consistency.  Turn into a bowl and stir in grated carrots, pineapple and nuts.  Pour batter into greased cake tin and bake on middle rack of oven.
  2. Bake in a greased and floured cake tin (or approximately 2-3 small cake tins) for approximately 1 hour or until toothpick comes out clean.  The baking time for the small tins will be shorter.
  3. This recipe can easily be doubled and the cakes can be frozen.

 


 

PEANUT BUTTER DATE BITES

Ingredients

  • 1 cup pitted fresh dates (if dry, allow to soak for 10 minutes prior)
  • 2/3 cup natural peanut butter (or any nut/seed butter)
  • 1/3 cup quick oats (use gluten-free oats if needed)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp chia or flax seeds
  • ¼ cup mini dark chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. Mix the dates in a food processor until dates are in small pieces.
  2. Add peanut butter, oats, vanilla and seeds. Mix in food processor. The mixture should be thick enough to form into balls without being too sticky. If it’s too sticky, add 1-2 more tbsp oats. If mixture is too dry, add 1-2 more tbsp peanut butter.
  3. Add the chocolate chips and mix gently by hand.
  4. Roll into small balls.
  5. Store in fridge.

 

How To Download and Listen to Podcasts

We love to podcast. It’s a great way to get information to our audience, inspire conversation and create a more intimate communication experience. For listeners it’s great because you can listen to podcasts whenever and wherever, while multi-tasking or just lounging around.

How to Download Podcasts
For those who are new to podcasts or who want more information about how to download podcasts, here’s an informative article.

How to Access AFN Podcasts
As podcast listening continues to grow, we wanted to make sure know how to access Alternative Food Network podcasts. Here are some options:

  1. Visit the podcast page on our website, press play and stream the podcast.
  2. Visit AFN’s podcast host, Spreaker and stream or download a podcast.
  3. Download a podcast app as further explained in the article referred to above.

No matter the listening method you choose, we hope you enjoy the experience.

New Food Guide

This week saw the publication by the Canadian government of the latest version of Canada’s food guide. The four food groups are gone. Instead, the guide promotes the regular intake of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and protein foods. For protein foods, it is suggested that plant-based foods be consumed more often but the guide still includes fish, eggs, dairy and lean meat in the list of such foods. As for beverages, water should be the beverage of choice according to the guide. And of course, put the brakes on eating foods high in sodium, sugar and saturated fat. The guide also places importance on food skills and literacy. It promotes more cooking at home, and reading food labels to help you make more informed food choices. Regarding that last point, I think it’s never too early to start reading food labels. I was pleasantly surprised the first time I saw my tween compare labels on our cereal boxes.

One issue that I have read about repeatedly in articles concerning the new food guide is that of food insecurity and that healthier food tends to be more expensive. While there is truth to that when it comes to fresh fruits and healthier consumer packaged goods, cooking healthy at home doesn’t have to be expensive. You can’t beat $1 for a can of beans or chickpeas! To celebrate the new food guide, I have included an easy hummus recipe below and the link to AFN’s Roasted Chickpea video on our website.

Easy Hummus

Ingredients

  • 1 can chickpeas (19 oz.)
  • ¼ cup liquid from can of chickpeas
  • 4 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons tahini*
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ½ teaspoon cumin

*If you are allergic to sesame or don’t have tahini at home, add some more olive oil or water to get a creamier texture.

Instructions

Drain chickpeas setting aside ¼ cup liquid from the can. Combine remaining ingredients in a food processor. Add the liquid from chickpeas. Process for 3 minutes, until smooth and creamy, scraping down sides of bowl as needed. Serve chilled.

New Food Guide

This week saw the the publication by the Canadian government of the latest version of Canada’s food guide [JP-link to the food guide that’s in the AFN Resources section]. The four food groups are gone. Instead, the guide promotes the regular intake of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and protein foods. For protein foods, it is suggested that plant-based foods be consumed more often but the guide still includes fish, eggs, dairy and lean meat in the list of such foods. As for beverages, water should be the beverage of choice according to the guide. And of course, put the brakes on eating foods high in sodium, sugar and saturated fat. The guide also places importance on food skills and literacy. It promotes more cooking at home, and reading food labels to help you make more informed food choices. Regarding that last point, I think it’s never too early to start reading food labels. I was pleasantly surprised the first time I saw my tween compare labels on our cereal boxes.

One issue that I have read about repeatedly this week in articles concerning the new food guide is that of food insecurity and that healthier food tends to be more expensive. While there is truth to that when it comes to fresh fruits and healthier consumer packaged goods, cooking healthy at home doesn’t have to be expensive. You can’t beat $1 for a can of beans or chickpeas! To celebrate the new food guide, I have included an easy hummus recipe below and the link to AFN’s Roasted Chickpea video on our website

Easy Hummus

Ingredients

  • 1 can chickpeas (19 oz.)
  • ¼ cup liquid from can of chickpeas
  • 4 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons tahini*
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ½ teaspoon cumin

*If you are allergic to sesame or don’t have tahini at home, add some more olive oil or water to get a creamier texture.

Instructions

Drain chickpeas setting aside ¼ cup liquid from the can. Combine remaining ingredients in a food processor. Add the liquid from chickpeas. Process for 3 minutes, until smooth and creamy, scraping down sides of bowl as needed. Serve chilled.

The Inflammation-Food Connection

One of AFN’s most popular podcasts is The Inflammation-Food Connection.

What is Inflammation?

According to naturopath Dr. Audrey Sasson, inflammation is essentially the body’s response to any damage, internal or external. In a Q & A published by Harvard Health Publishing, Dr. Deepak Bhatt, M.D., M.PH. states that inflammation is the body’s natural response to protect itself against harm and there are two types: acute and chronic. According to Dr. Bhatt, acute inflammation occurs “when you bang your knee or cut your finger. Your immune system dispatches an army of white blood cells to surround and protect the area, creating visible redness and swelling.” Dr. Bhatt continues to explain that chronic inflammation can occur “in response to other unwanted substances in the body, such as toxins from cigarette smoke or an excess of fat cells”.

Anti-inflammatory Diet

In AFN’s podcast, Dr. Sasson asserts that one’s diet can truly help combat inflammation. Examples of inflammatory foods are dairy, alcohol, artificial sweeteners, processed meats, foods high in trans and saturated fats and refined sugar. Ultimately these are the foods we should try to avoid to decrease inflammation and the negative effects that come along with it. Instead, Dr. Sasson suggests to opt for antioxidants as they help counteract inflammation. Having more whole grains and “the good” fatty foods such as salmon and olive oils are also an excellent choice. In Canada and the United States, foods that contribute to inflammation are seen more on peoples’ tables. Western diets are higher in omega 6’s and low in the essential omega 3’s, and according to Dr. Audrey, this needs to be the opposite.

Whether you have irritable bowel disease, sore joints or skin problems, take a look at your diet. Perhaps some changes in the foods you eat will be beneficial. Love your body and watch what you put in it.

All content or opinions expressed in this blog are for informational purposes only and are not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please seek advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare practitioner.

Party Planning Tips for Guests with Food Allergies and Other Restrictions

Event and party planning can feel overwhelming, especially if there are guests with food restrictions. Here are some tips for both the host and the guest.

Tips for Host:

  • If a guest has an anaphylaxis reaction, immediately call 911.
  • Err on the side of caution by not having the specific allergen present, if possible.
  • Alert caterer/staff/servers about guests with food allergies.
  • Provide a similar looking food for the child with a food restriction. For example, if guests are having cupcakes and a child has celiac, purchase a gluten-free cupcake for that child.
  • Plan ahead.
  • Consider a party planner for a larger event.

Tips for Guest:

  • Inform your host of your food restrictions in advance of the event. Don’t be shy.
  • Add your food restrictions on the rsvp card or send a note to the host
  • If you have severe food allergies and are worried about the host not being able to adequately accommodate your food allergy, consider eating before the event.
  • Having a food allergy is never something to be embarrassed about.
  • Always carry epinephrine if you have a food allergy.

For more, listen to AFN’s podcast about how to plan a party for guests with food allergies

All content provided or opinions expressed in this blog are for informational purposes only and are not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please seek advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare practitioner.

 

 

Sports Nutrition & Supplements: An Olympic Athlete’s Story

Food is fuel and for athletes this concept is extremely important. Whether you take part in sports recreationally or you’re a weekend warrior, proper nutrition is crucial to success.

“Eating a balanced amount of carbohydrate, fat and protein is important to play sports at your best” according  to this article published on the Dietitians of Canada website.

Athletes often push their bodies past what might be physically possible, and they require foods with high nutritional density for peak performance. It is also important to focus on real foods. According to Olympic athlete Meagan Duhamel who was interviewed by Alternative Food Network on its podcast about sports nutrition, this means having foods with high nutritional content first (things like quinoa or legumes) and not focusing on foods that might fit the bill in terms of caloric or fat intake but have no real nutritional value.

The Vegan Athlete

It has become somewhat of a trend for athletes to adopt a vegan diet and in AFN’s podcast, Duhamel talks about her specific needs as a vegan athlete and someone who is training. She also talks about the use of supplements but stresses real foods first, supplements second.

That being said, there are certain supplements that Duhamel herself takes such as iron and B12. If you are a vegan athlete, it is important to know that the type of iron offered by plant-based foods is less absorbable than the iron that comes from animal-based foods. According to Duhamel, while she eats vitamin C-rich foods with iron-based foods in order to increase absorption of the iron, she also takes an iron supplement. Similarly, people and specifically athletes who are vegan should consider supplementing B12 as this vitamin is not abundant in plant-based foods.

Anti-Inflammatory Foods & Recovery

Training differs everyday for athletes and it’s a good idea to plan recovery snacks and meals. Recovery foods help to reduce dreaded inflammation and can help repair sore and tight muscles. Duhamel says foods with flavonoids – what gives fruits and vegetables their colour – help to reduce inflammation and strengthen collagen in the body. Turmeric (curcumin) is also an excellent anti-inflammatory that can help with pain.  Some of Duhamel’s favourite snacks post training are pineapple with hemp seeds and sweet potatoes.

Hydration

Hydration is a key component in sport. Duhamel recommends water or coconut water. Particularly if you sweat a lot in your sport, Duhamel also recommends adding some salt to water in order to add sodium to help replace lost electrolytes. And, beware of sugary sports drinks filled with artificial sugars.

You can find the full podcast on Alternative Food Network’s website or click here to listen.

All content provided or opinions expressed in this blog are for informational purposes only and are not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please seek advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare practitioner.

L’alimentation idéale pour un cerveau en santé

Listen to “L’alimentation idéale pour un cerveau en santé” on Spreaker. Peu importe votre âge, il n’est jamais trop tôt ou trop tard pour commencer à manger de façon à  soutenir nos fonctions cérébrales. Dans cette baladodiffusion, Dr. Guylaine Ferland, Ph.D. se joint à Stéphanie Julien, ND.A pour discuter de ce que nous devrions manger pour un cerveau en santé.  À quel âge devrions-nous commencer et si nous le pouvons réellement, comment améliorer nos fonctions cognitives en changeant notre alimentation?

You Just Never Know: Introducing AFN’s French Language Podcast Series

You never know what can happen when you meet someone at a conference or networking event. There I was, standing in line for my guilty pleasure to see cast members from the hit tv show This Is Usat South by Southwest in Austin when I struck up a conversation with the person in line behind me. It turned out we were both from Canada; he from Montreal and me from Toronto. We talked about what we were doing at the festival. In our conversation I mentioned that I was contemplating producing some French language podcasts and he told me he knew a great person with whom I should speak.

Fast forward three months. I’m writing this blog from the balcony of a lovely European-style hotel in Montreal after overseeing the recording of three French language podcasts for AFN. Not only did the gentleman in line with me that day in Austin record and edit the podcasts, but the host is indeed that same person he had recommended to me three months earlier.

For all of you French speakers out there, we hope you enjoy these podcasts. Click here to listen to the first one.

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